Narrative essay

Whenever I think of the incident that transpired on that particular Thursday afternoon, I get a nasty feeling about the challenges of working as a respiratory therapist. Is it that all the health care practitioners should have a calling to their work or should work as a profession? As a respiratory therapist, I usually work in the intensive care and the operating rooms, but I also engage in the outpatient activities. I am a specialist and an educator in the fields of cardiology and pulmonology. Most of the patients I attend to are in the ICU and the emergency departments struggling for their lives. At times, I manage the pre-hospital and the hospital to hospital patient transport by air or by mobile road ambulance. Most of the patients have illnesses ranging from asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. Other have a heart attack and sleep disorders. On a certain Thursday afternoon late last year, I had one of the many challenges in my line of service.

I reported to work as usual and said a prayer before the start of my daily chores. I attended to several patients having varying illnesses, and most of them had a hope of getting well in due time. I decided to take a short rest during lunch hour after realizing that there were no more patients to attend. However, after few minutes, I received a call from the hospital superintendent that there was an emergency case I required to attend. The details clarified that I had to travel with several nurses to a nearby village to seek what we could do to save the situation. There was a man in his later forties who lived with asthma for a long time. I looked at him in desperation knowing that I could do my best to save the situation though he was in a life-threatening stage. He could not talk, had flared nostrils, his skin was bluish tint from the mouth region and under the fingernails. The man lacked adequate oxygen circulation in the blood stream.

My professional’s values require that I serve to the best of my ability to save lives and restore health. We teamed up with the nurses to address the condition, but our attempts seemed futile. All our first aid attempts failed to change the situation. I instructed the nurses to lay him in the ambulance and rush to the hospital for further treatment. I think that it was a rough day for me since every other attempt to save the man failed. He lost his life as we worked tirelessly to save it. I felt discouraged, guilty, and emotionally disturbed and could not attend to other patients that day. I questioned my work as a respiratory therapist and whether it was a calling or out of influence to study the particular discipline. According to my understanding, such occurrences were inevitable, but some could be saved regardless of their severity. I did not understand why the man could lose his life in the hands of professionals and experts in the field.

It was sad news to the close family members and very challenging to break the same news to the wife who was also ill of another health condition. In some instances, the experiences of healthcare practitioners are hard to relate with though they form part of the daily life. The work of a respiratory therapist is challenging, but the desire to continue improving the quality of life compels me to serve wholeheartedly.

Journal Identification

SECTION B: JOURNAL IDENTIFICATION TABLE
Journal title
Internal Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
URL link to “Information for Authors”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nlmcatalog/101554912

Intended audiences
Policy makers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors, scholars in the clinical pharmacy discipline, general public

Mission of the journal
It intends to offer a platform for the publication of clinical pharmacy articles and related practice-oriented subjects in pharmaceutical sciences. They include clinical pharmacy, pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical care, pharmacy services research, clinical use of medicines, medical devices, and laboratory tests, and other clinical aspects of pharmacy

Publishing frequency
Bimonthly since 2011

Areas of topics
The scope of the Internal Journal of Clinical Pharmacy that entails the clinical pharmacy, its research and application in areas such as pharmaceutical care. Apart from this topics, others include Pharmacotherapy and outcome research

Clinical pharmacy
Pharmacoeconomics
Pharmacoepidemiology
Pharmaceutical care
Pharmacy services research
Clinical use of medicines, medical equipment, and laboratory tests
Current information regarding medications and medical devices
Medication management
Other clinical aspects of pharmacy
Types of articles in this journal

Reviews: This kind of articles should not exceed 3000 words excluding abstract and references. The structure should be as follows: Introduction, Aim of the review, Method, Results, Discussion and Conclusion. A structured abstract of maximum 350 words with the headings should also be provided: Background, Aim of the Review, Method, Results, and Conclusion.

Research articles: This type of articles should not exceed 3000 words excluding tables, figures, abstract, and references. They structure should be as follows: Introduction, Aim of the study, Ethical approval, Method, Results, Discussion, and Conclusion. A structured abstract of maximum 350 words with the headings: Background, Objective, Setting, Method, Main outcome measure, Results, Conclusion. Articles describing qualitative research get exemptions from having 4000 words in length.

Short research reports: This type of articles give the preliminary or limited results of original research and should not exceed 1500 words excluding abstract and have a maximum of 10 references. The structure of a short research report is similar to a research article, and they may only contain two tables or figures. The structure of the abstract of maximum 200 words with the headings: Background, Objective, Method, Results, Conclusion should get provided.

Case reports: This type of articles should not exceed 1500 words excluding abstract, but including a maximum of 10 references and only 1 table or figure. This kind of articles gets structured as follows: Introduction, Ethical approval, Case Description, Discussion, and Conclusion. A structured abstract of maximum 150 words with the headings: Case (description) and Conclusion should get provided.

Commentaries: This type of article allows writers to convey thoughts, considerations, opinions, or discuss issues. These articles should not exceed 2000 words, including a maximum of 20 references and only contain two tables or figures. An unstructured abstract of maximum 150 words gets required.

Letters to the Editor: Letters that comment on a published article will get considered for publication. The letters should not exceed 1000 words, including a maximum of 5 references and only containing a maximum of 1 table or figure. An abstract does not get required.

Brief description of the peer review process
All submissions including commentaries and letters were necessary to get peer reviewed by experts. The paper first gets checked for adherence to the instructions and the editorial policy of the journal. Plagiarism, as well as all references, then gets checked. If approved, the submission will be sent to reviewers. The review procedure takes approximately six weeks; although it may take up to 3 months sometimes. The author then receives information regarding acceptance of their article, needed revisions or rejection of their submission.

Impact factor
Current impact factor:
1.35

Impact Factor Rankings

2014 / 2015 Impact Factor

1.348

2013 Impact Factor

1.25

2012 Impact Factor

0.859

(Researchgate, 2016)

Reflection
One unique/distinct aspect of the journal

The Journal has an entirely web-enabled manuscript submission and review system. The system provides authors the option of tracking the review process of their manuscripts in real time. The log-in and submission procedures provided by the online manuscript and review system are not only comfortable but also straightforward, hence providing little or no problems to authors. A wide range of submission file formats that include Word, WordPerfect, TXT, RTF, and LaTeX for article text and EPS, PS, TIFF, GIF, JPEG and PPT for figures get supported. Only PDF manuscripts have not got accepted.

The Black Woman and Family

Question 1
The shift of welfare rhetoric from inept mothers to calculating parasites was with the use of imageries such as race and gender images including matriarch and mammy. The imageries helped in the development of the perception that the family formation of the black community comprised of a bad black mother. Black women who relied on welfare were presented as bad mothers who engaged in irresponsible behavior. The women were presented as women who failed in their efforts to protect their offspring. The perception ignited the desire to control and regulate childbearing. The public got the impression that the single mothers were calculating parasites who strived to raise their children alone so that they can enjoy welfare support at the expense of other hard working citizens (Jordan-Zachery, 2009).

It was brought to the attention of the public that the majority of women enjoying the welfare benefits are not widowed women but young unmarried women. The term urban teen mother was coined to define the women enjoying welfare support. It emerged that the single mother had to get married so that their husbands can take their rightful position as breadwinners of the family thus unburdening the government the role of providing welfare services. Members of Congress, as well as some presidents, have been known to give black women under welfare titles such as the Jezebel, the matriarch, and the Sapphire. The titles give the impression that the black woman has manipulated and controlled the government so that they can continue to bear children and the government continues to offer support (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The black woman was thus not a good woman unless she was married and did not depend on welfare support.

Question 2
The perception of the “black family” as deviant can be traced back to the era of slavery where the slaves were not allowed to have families. The denial arose from the perception that the black people were lesser beings than the whites. The perception of the “black family” continues to be perceived as deviant in several ways. Most black families are headed by single women. Unfortunately, the black female-headed household is perceived as wrong and the justification of the high poverty rates among black families. Unending and increasing levels of poverty increase the number of families that are homeless as well as the rate of social ills in society. Society perceives the ideal family as one that is headed by the man. The black family is deviant as the black woman is perceived as having refused to conform to the patriarchal family formation (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The black woman is thus perceived as the cause of damage to the black man and the black community.

There have also been efforts at establishing policies that will promote fatherhood. The efforts are tied to the assumption that families headed by fathers result to healthy marriages and stable families. The black family is deviant as it is largely female-headed thus promoting fragile families. The policies are based on the patriarchal ideology that centers men as dominant individuals in a family unit. There has also been increased emphasis on controlling the sexuality and morality of black women (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The requirement that black women must disclose their sexual history to receive public assistance is an example of efforts to control the sexuality and morality of the black woman. There have also been instances where substance-abusing black women have received money in exchange for sterilization.