The Black Woman and Family

Question 1
The shift of welfare rhetoric from inept mothers to calculating parasites was with the use of imageries such as race and gender images including matriarch and mammy. The imageries helped in the development of the perception that the family formation of the black community comprised of a bad black mother. Black women who relied on welfare were presented as bad mothers who engaged in irresponsible behavior. The women were presented as women who failed in their efforts to protect their offspring. The perception ignited the desire to control and regulate childbearing. The public got the impression that the single mothers were calculating parasites who strived to raise their children alone so that they can enjoy welfare support at the expense of other hard working citizens (Jordan-Zachery, 2009).

It was brought to the attention of the public that the majority of women enjoying the welfare benefits are not widowed women but young unmarried women. The term urban teen mother was coined to define the women enjoying welfare support. It emerged that the single mother had to get married so that their husbands can take their rightful position as breadwinners of the family thus unburdening the government the role of providing welfare services. Members of Congress, as well as some presidents, have been known to give black women under welfare titles such as the Jezebel, the matriarch, and the Sapphire. The titles give the impression that the black woman has manipulated and controlled the government so that they can continue to bear children and the government continues to offer support (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The black woman was thus not a good woman unless she was married and did not depend on welfare support.

Question 2
The perception of the “black family” as deviant can be traced back to the era of slavery where the slaves were not allowed to have families. The denial arose from the perception that the black people were lesser beings than the whites. The perception of the “black family” continues to be perceived as deviant in several ways. Most black families are headed by single women. Unfortunately, the black female-headed household is perceived as wrong and the justification of the high poverty rates among black families. Unending and increasing levels of poverty increase the number of families that are homeless as well as the rate of social ills in society. Society perceives the ideal family as one that is headed by the man. The black family is deviant as the black woman is perceived as having refused to conform to the patriarchal family formation (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The black woman is thus perceived as the cause of damage to the black man and the black community.

There have also been efforts at establishing policies that will promote fatherhood. The efforts are tied to the assumption that families headed by fathers result to healthy marriages and stable families. The black family is deviant as it is largely female-headed thus promoting fragile families. The policies are based on the patriarchal ideology that centers men as dominant individuals in a family unit. There has also been increased emphasis on controlling the sexuality and morality of black women (Jordan-Zachery, 2009). The requirement that black women must disclose their sexual history to receive public assistance is an example of efforts to control the sexuality and morality of the black woman. There have also been instances where substance-abusing black women have received money in exchange for sterilization.

The Big Stage

As a prosecutor, explain the final report to the prosecution of a case is always important. The first importance of this report is that it helps the prosecution to identify the critical elements of the case as well as the most reliable admissible evidence by which every element will get approval. This means that the report will help to identify any facts favorable to the defendant and any representations from the defense over the likely prosecution. The final report is also important to the prosecution because it helps in identifying the evidence which may be needed to rebut the likely lines of argument from the defendant (Gibson, 2002). In this case, the report provides expert evidence, to rebut any potential defense arguments by foreseeability. The final report to the prosecution of a case is also important because it encompasses the views of the victim on the suggested prosecution. If the victim’s statement has been taken, this becomes availed by the Approval Officer, and if the victim hasn’t made a statement, his views become nevertheless considered in the prosecution report. The final report to the prosecution of a case also sets out the aggravating, mitigating as well as other factors that are critical to sentencing. This serves the purpose of providing a vivid summary for the approval officer. As a result, it helps in a Friskies schedule production if the case is approved.

In the prosecution process, there is possible impact of poorly completed final reports on a case. Poorly completed final reports hinder the prosecution to prove guilt beyond reasonable doubt. Such reports fail to provide rebuttal from the defense, and as a result, the case can be lost. Poorly prepared final prosecution report can also lead to injustice to the defendant (Tong, Bryant & Horvath, 2009). This shows that the accused can get a harsher punishment than what is just. At the same time, poorly prepared prosecution report can lead to the miscarriage of justice whereby the defendant can be left off the hook because of prosecution negligence. Poorly prepared final prosecution reports can leave loopholes where the defense attorneys, as well as the judge, can dismiss the case. Finally, poorly prepared prosecution report for a case can make the court to demand fresh investigation and prosecution of the case. This is not only waste of time, but also criminal justice system resources.

There are different stages in the Criminal Justice Process where evidence is provided to merit the case. Each of these stages is important in building a successfully litigated action. The first evidentiary stage is the preliminary hearing. This stage is important because it determines whether or not there is enough evidence exists against the defendant to continue the litigated action. This process allows the prosecutor to test the evidential strength at his disposal. This is important in making the judge decide if a crime was indeed committed and if there is the likelihood that the person in the court committed it. Therefore, this process is important for successful litigation. The second stage where evidence is provided in the justice process is the information or indictment stage. In this case, the grand jury listens to the evidence from the prosecutor and determines whether a case needs to face the trial (National Institute of Justice & National Research Council, 2001). Hence, the prosecutor has to provide evidence to determine the probable cause to charge the defendant formally. The last stage in which evidence is provided in the court process takes place during the trial. This happens when there have not been pleas, or the case has been dismissed because of different reasons. During the trial process, there are laws which govern the evidence submission. These regulations are tightly procedural law as well as precedent controlled. During this process, the procedural law specifies the type of evidence to be submitted, the credentials allowed representing the parties and what the jury can hear. This is a stage whereby the prosecution is always tasked with proving the guilty beyond a reasonable doubt or the defendant is left off the hook by the judge during judgment. Therefore, the preliminary hearing, indictment, as well as the trial, is three states in the court process where evidence is provided. In sum, preliminary hearing evidence helps to convince the judge that the defendant has a case to answer while the indictment proves to the jury that the defendant is liable for prosecution. On the other hand, the trial evidence is important to ensure justice is served. Thus, the three stages are important for successful litigation action.

A criminal investigator plays important roles in preparing a case for the court. This involves collecting and using forensic evidence as a way of solves crimes. He or she also interview suspects, informants, as well as witnesses to determine alibis, time frames, clues as well as possible suspects. He also bags the evidence carefully to ensure that it meets prosecution. He also runs personal identification database as a way of obtaining matches. Criminal investigators also play a role of collect sufficient evidence to support criminal case in the court criminal. They also process crime scenes, file evidence, follow up on leads and prepare investigative reports to be used by the prosecution. They also attend and make autopsies notes and prepare evidence sketches as well as diagrams. Criminal investigators are also important in obtaining search warrants, carrying out surveillance to monitor suspects, analyze criminal tests among others.

The work of criminal investigators always involves cooperation with the prosecution as a way of enhancing courtroom presentation. Criminal investigators always work jointly with the prosecutor in explaining to the jury regarding the significance of evidence about the proof. They also collect sufficient evidence which is shared by the prosecution to support courtroom presentation. Criminal investigators also collaborate with prosecutors by sharing suspect interview responses. This is important in careful evidence presentation in the courtroom to ensure a successful prosecution.

Not guilty and acquitted are two terms that are always found in the criminal justice system. Acquittal is where the accused becomes free of the criminal charge based on the criminal law (Riddell, 1916). In this case, the prosecution has failed to proof its burden of proof. On the other hand, not guilty means legally blameless. This is where the court finds the offender blameless after the prosecution has provided its full evidence. Thus, Not guilty’ is a decision made by the court concerning an individual charged with committing a particular offense to being freed after being blameless while acquittal means the prosecution have failed in its duty. Therefore, in my opinion, an acquittal means that the investigator failed. The reason is that the investigators must always use his evidence and knit it to the case to convince the court that the defendant is guilty or has a case to answer. Therefore, the investigator must always follow the procedural law to guide the prosecution in defending the case.

In 20 years time, there are some changes that may permeate the criminal investigation. One of the will be the use of radio frequency in investigations. This will help to track evidence source as well as forensic details to facilitate successful prosecution.

PMP Prerequisites: Explained

Before embarking on the journey to become a Project Management Professional (PMP), it is crucial to understand and fulfill the prerequisites set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). The PMP certification is globally recognized and demonstrates an individual’s proficiency and competence in project management. This article outlines the prerequisites required to pursue PMP certification, ensuring that aspiring professionals are well-prepared for the process.

Educational Background
One of the primary prerequisites for PMP certification is having a solid educational background. PMI mandates that candidates possess a secondary degree (high school diploma, associate’s degree, or global equivalent) or a four-year degree (bachelor’s degree or global equivalent). This educational requirement serves as a foundation for the complex project management concepts covered in the certification exam.

Project Management Experience
In addition to educational qualifications, PMP candidates must also demonstrate substantial project management experience. The amount of required experience varies depending on the candidate’s educational background:

Secondary Degree Holders: Candidates with a secondary degree must have at least five years (60 months) of project management experience. This experience should include leading and directing projects, as well as managing project teams and stakeholders.
Four-Year Degree Holders: Those with a four-year degree need to have accumulated a minimum of three years (36 months) of project management experience. Similar to secondary degree holders, this experience should encompass various aspects of project management, from initiation to closure.
Project Management Education
In addition to practical experience, PMI also emphasizes the importance of formal project management education. Candidates are required to complete 35 hours of project management education before applying for the PMP exam. This educational component aims to provide candidates with a comprehensive understanding of project management principles, methodologies, and best practices.

PMP Exam Preparation
Once the prerequisites have been met, candidates can proceed with exam preparation. The PMP certification exam assesses a candidate’s knowledge and understanding of project management concepts across five domains:

Initiating
Planning
Executing
Monitoring and Controlling
Closing
Candidates must thoroughly study the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide, which serves as the primary reference for the exam. Additionally, various PMP exam prep courses, study guides, and practice exams are available to help candidates prepare effectively.

Application Process
After completing the necessary education and gaining the required project management experience, candidates can submit their application for the PMP exam. The application requires detailed information about the candidate’s educational background, project management experience, and project management education.

Audit Process
Upon submission of the application, candidates may be randomly selected for an audit. During the audit process, candidates are required to provide documentation, such as project summaries and proof of project management education. It is essential to maintain accurate records of project management experience and education to expedite the audit process, if selected.

Exam Administration
Once the application is approved, candidates receive an authorization to schedule (ATS) email from PMI, allowing them to schedule their exam appointment. The PMP exam is administered at designated Prometric testing centers worldwide. It consists of 180 multiple-choice questions and has a duration of four hours.

Continuing Education
Obtaining PMP certification is not the end of the journey; it is the beginning of a commitment to continuous professional development. PMP credential holders are required to earn 60 professional development units (PDUs) every three years to maintain their certification. PDUs can be earned through various activities, such as attending workshops, webinars, and conferences, as well as engaging in project management-related activities.

In conclusion, meeting the prerequisites for PMP certification involves a blend of educational qualifications, project management experience, and formal education in project management. By fulfilling these requirements and successfully passing the PMP exam, individuals can demonstrate their proficiency and commitment to the field. Continuous learning and professional development are crucial for maintaining PMP certification and staying updated on evolving industry trends and practices, including undergoing PMP training.